Featured Headlines

NASA photograph by Steve Moon Space

Partnership, teamwork enable landmark science glovebox launch to ISS

As the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's H-IIB rocket carries NASA's Life Sciences Glovebox toward its berth on the International Space Station, hardware specialists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., and their partners around the world are eager to initiate new, high-value biological research in Earth orbit.

Army photograph by Charles Rosemond Defense

Army innovation through re-engineering

In 1801, Eli Whitney disassembled ten muskets made from interchangeable parts, placed the parts in a big pile, and then reassembled ten muskets from parts picked at random, demonstrating the revolutionizing concept of interchangeable parts.

Courtesy photograph Local

Tailwheel: The mascot of War Eagle Field

As the saying goes, if you’re performing, never follow a child or animal act for you will surely fail! My apologies to anyone who has ever fallen victim to that, because this issue’s story is a yarn of a beloved pet that sure goes a long way in bringing a smile to one’s face.

bae-pilot Technology

BAE Systems eyes novel way of flying

Experts at BAE Systems are developing technologies to enable pilots to control the fighter jet of the future with the blink of an eye. As military domains become more contested, technologies become more complex, and sources of data multiply it is crucial that pilots are able to quickly access, assess and act on critical information.

NASA illustration Space

Final Delta II launch orbits NASA polar ice probe

Liftoff of a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., on Sept. 15 marked the end of an era for a workhorse launch vehicle and a significant leap forward for environmental science. The booster — the last of its type — carried NASA’s Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2), a state-of-the-art climate observation probe. The spacecraft is equipped with the most advanced laser instrument of its kind to measure the average annual changes in Earth’s polar ice sheets.


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Northrop Grumman photograph
Business

Northrop Grumman showcases autonomous maritime capabilities

Posted  September 19, 2018

Northrop Grumman in collaboration with industry partners participated in the U.S. Navy’s Advanced Naval Technology Exercise last month in Newport, R.I. The company demonstrated advanced capabilities in the command and control of future unmanned maritime missions and the ability to more effectively deliver critical information to the warfighter in contested environments.

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News

T-6A Texan II Crash

Posted  September 19, 2018

A 12th Flying Training Wing T-6A Texan II crashed near Rolling Oaks Mall in Texas at approximately 4 p.m., Sept. 18. The crew ejected and is safe with minor injuries reported at the site. Both were transported to the Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph Medical Clinic for evaluation and both pilots were released. There were no…

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Air Force photograph by Heide Couch
Defense

AFRL team looks to solve fatigue issues for C-5 crew members

Posted  September 19, 2018

Air Force photograph by JD Bales A lightweight and foldable seat is one of two initial prototype designs created by Air Force Research Laboratory researchers in an effort to implement a safer and less fatiguing way for Air Force crew members to perform flight duties. An aircraft seat may seem inconsequential, but when a simple…

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Business

Lockheed Martin completes 400th electro-optical targeting system for F-35

Posted  September 19, 2018

Lockheed Martin has delivered the 400th Electro-Optical Targeting System for the F-35 Lightning II stealth fighter. The 400th EOTS was completed under the 11th Low-Rate-Initial Production contract and each system was delivered on time or ahead of schedule. “Achieving this milestone demonstrates the growth and dedication of the F-35 EOTS program,” said Michael Williamson, vice…

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Northrop Grumman photograph
Defense

Army researchers develop software to ensure that if a military robot falls, it can get itself up

Posted  September 19, 2018

Scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have developed software to ensure that if a robot falls, it can get itself back up, meaning future military robots will be less reliant on their Soldier handlers.

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